Monthly Archives: September 2013

Dangerous Passage by Lisa Harris

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When Avery gets handed a new case, a young Asian girl who was murdered, it hits close to home. Though she’s been a detective for several years, it’s always harder when a teenager is involved, since her daughter Tess is close to the same age. Jackson, the medical examiner is a great help to Avery in her cases, but lately there has been more than just work between them.

Could a serial killer be on the loose? That seems to be the case as they dig deeper. Until one night when Avery’s home is broken into, and Avery comes close to being killed.

It just isn’t adding up. Avery has had trouble letting go of the death of her brother, who was also an officer, working undercover. Could the two be connected? Or is the killer just trying to get Avery sidetracked?

The story was good here, but I think the author could have made everything clearer in the end. I’m still a little unsure as to her brother’s death, and the person she suspected of his murder all throughout the book. But even without the perfect clarity, this was still a good plot that held my attention through to the end.

On sale now in your favorite Revell book store, a division of Baker Publishing.

I received the book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

Categories: 50 Books in a Year, Book reviews | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

The Invention of Sarah Cummings by Olivia Newport

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Sarah’s world changed when she was a little girl. When she arrived home from school one afternoon, she learned both her parents had been killed. She was immediately sent to an orphanage where she finished out her growing-up years. Simon Tewell, the young administrator, sees something special in Sarah. But can Sarah see it?

When Sarah, now grown and employed as a parlor maid, is out for the afternoon, a young society lady begins speaking to her. As they converse, and the young lady asks her name, “Serena Cuthbert” pops out of Sarah’s mouth. Thus begins the alternate life of Sarah. Since the family she works for is away for the summer, Sarah is able to befriend Lillie as Serena, and have a fun summer of outings and pretending.

But the plot thickens. Serena meets a young eligible bachelor. He is rich, and well-to-do. He is very interested in Serena. He can give her all she has ever hoped for. But are his intentions honorable? Will he find out her true identity?

Meanwhile, St. Andrews Orphanage is in trouble. Simon wants to get closer to Sarah – she has so much to give. Will Sarah see the truth? Will she be able to invent who she truly is?

This was a good read, from start to finish, with a classic happy ending.

On sale now in your favorite Revell book store, a division of Baker Publishing.

I received the book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

 

 

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Trapped by Irene Hannon

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“When Laura Griffith’s sixteen-year-old sister disappears on a frigid February day, leaving only a brief note behind, Laura resolves to do whatever it takes to track down the runaway teen. That includes recruiting ATF agent turned private investigator James Devlin to help. Dev knows time is of the essence with runaways – just forty-eight hours can mean the different between recovery and ruin.” Reads the back of the book.

This started out as most “missing-person-mystery-suspense” novels. Darcy runs away and you see glimpses into her brief time on the street. Those she befriends, choices she makes, as she waits out the mega-blizzard that just hit the city, preventing her from leaving as quickly as she wanted.

Laura is worried sick and hires Dev, a PI, to find Darcy. Sparks fly as they spend time together working on the case. But of course, a client is off-limits as a romantic interest, so that part will have to wait.

When Mark enters the plot, you know something is not right with him. But he is so kind and generous, and the man runs a day-care center for crying out loud! The story takes a completely shocking turn with Mark! Prepare to be completely and utterly stunned! This one is not as predictable as many other Christian suspense novels I’ve read.

I will not spoil the ending, but I was happy with it. 🙂

On sale now in your favorite Revell book store, a division of Baker Publishing.

I received the book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

Categories: 50 Books in a Year, Book reviews | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

The Promise by Dan Walsh and Gary Smalley

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Written by two great authors, this was a romance novel different than any other. In most novels, two people meet and fall in love, and the story ends there. Instead, this one picks up in the middle, with a marriage well underway, complete with children, and the stresses of life. Tom has a dark secret he feels he can’t tell Jean. So on it goes, month after month. He knows he needs to tell her, but he just can’t bring himself to do it. All the while, Jean feels she is losing her husband and maybe he is being unfaithful. But she has a little secret of her own which can only complicate things.

As the story goes on, you see a family’s love. You can see how they have all made past mistakes and are trying to undo the bad legacy they have created with a new one filled with hope, and of following God.

This was a sweet story, and one I could more relate to since it’s the middle of a marriage, not just the starry-eyed newlyweds. A very good read!

On sale in your favorite Revell bookstore now!

I received the book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

Categories: 50 Books in a Year, Book reviews | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

On Distant Shores by Sarah Sundin

Set during World War II, this romance will keep you reading from start to finish!

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Georgie is a country girl from a farm on Virginia, but she followed her best friend into nursing school, and into the military to be a flight nurse. She knows her job, but she has trouble during a crisis, and it causes problems more than once. If only she could do it right! She knows she can, but when she no longer has her friend, will she have the guts to keep going?

Hutch is a pharmacist with the medical group on the battlefield. He knows his job and is very good at it. The army looks down on pharmacists, and thinks any medical personnel can do a simple prescription. But over and over again, they are proven wrong. Pharmacists are needed. But can Hutch and his father help America, and the Army see it before too many are hurt?

As the battle rages, lives are lost. Friends are forever gone. Georgie and Hutch meet each other, and form a great friendship. But both are engaged to loved ones back home. They both have a deep faith, and commitment to God and their loves, so they try to ignore the sparks flying between them. But as time goes on, that will change…

I loved this book and loved the time period. It gave me even more of an appreciation for the military, and for each person who does their job to keep our country safe. And the romance here is timeless! Definitely a winner!

I received the book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

Categories: 50 Books in a Year, Book reviews | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Man in the Making by Rick Johnson

“As your son grows toward manhood, you can instill in him the values and character traits he will need to succeed. Highlighting famous men throughout history and the character trait that made each an outstanding model of manhood, parenting expert Rick Johnson gives you strategies to help mold your son into an honorable man. Johnson describes the lives of men such as

  • George Washington
  • Abraham Lincoln
  • Benjamin Franklin

…and more,” reads the back of the book.

 

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Mr. Johnson has a very unique approach to this book. I love how he uses specific people and shows their character, and then follows through how each man learned the character trait and used it to succeed in life.

I must say, right off the bat I was disappointed in the introduction when Mr. Johnson said, “…I did not discuss [in this book] developing faith or spirituality within your son. Again, not because I do not believe it is vitally important, but because I wanted this book to be one that will reach parents of all faith walks and belief systems. I wanted the focus to be on raising sons to become good men, not necessarily ‘religious’ ones.” So, I felt like he shot through everything in which he preceded this comment. He said faith is vitally important, and was very visible in each of these men’s lives. Also, as a Christian, I am not at all interested in raising my sons to be “good,” but to be “godly.” So, that said, on to the positive!

I really enjoyed reading super-short biographies of each of these men who greatly impacted history. It was amazing to see how far some of them came, and how they “beat the odds” and made a difference in the world.

I was particularly interested in the chapter on Compassion and Empathy, highlighting the life of George Muller. In this chapter, the author tells us that he believes hunting is one of the greatest way to teach sons about compassion, and appreciation for life. Think about it, many boys today never set foot in the woods. They spend their days playing violent video games. These games create a very false perception of life and death. Because young men may never see what real life is like, and what it’s like to take it, they become more violent. But let the boy shoot a deer or a squirrel, and see it die. It will help him appreciate life, and see a true picture of what happens when you shoot a gun, or a bow and arrow.

I also really loved the chapter about David, and how he was a Warrior-Poet. He was such a tough man, doing battle, killing thousands. But all you have to do is read through the Psalms and you see his tender side. It is not bad to let boys participate in the arts, or in music. It is good for them. They need to create, and learn that it doesn’t mean they are sissy. But let them be rough-and-tumble. The book mentioned that society has become so feminized that often in schools, instead of two boys scuffling on the playground, they are forced to go to their superiors (usually a woman), to solve the problem. Not that we want to encourage them to be violent! Or to be bullies! But let them grow up to be men!

I think a really, really good point of this book is that the author points out that neither men, nor women are superior in our culture. God set man as the head of a home, and the pastors of churches. But women have seen such a need to be equal, that they have gone completely overboard! They make masculinity out to be brutal and uncaring, just to make women look better. But really men don’t have to be downgraded to help women feel more equal. Both contribute greatly to life, family, and society in many different ways. Don’t make boys think it will be bad to grow up and be a man.

This was a longer review than I usually write. I really feel there was a LOT of good content here that would benefit any parents of boys!

I received the book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

Categories: 50 Books in a Year, Book reviews | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

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